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Steven Pinker and How Communication Relates to Revolution

creed of reason

creed of reason

I’m getting to appreciate Steven Pinker more and more (that was not always so). Two fresh video clips embedded below.

Yesterday, I watched The Great Debate Panel where Lawrence Krauss and Steven Pinker made some really beautiful points about how both science & literature connect and philosophy & literature connect—points that are, not coincidentally, very much related to an example I use in a lecture recently, with a quote from J. Hillis Miller that quite ingeniously connects literature with Immanuel Kant’s Categorical Imperative.

A couple hours later a new RSA Animate video popped up in my feed reader, and it’s also very good! As a bonus, Pinker even sheds some light on the dynamics of protests in general and, in a neat coincidence, those in Egypt and all over the Middle East right now in particular.

Enjoy!

RSA Animate—Language as a Window into Human Nature

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The Great Debate Panel: A lively panel discussion between Sam Harris, Patricia Smith Churchland, Peter Singer, Lawrence Krauss, Simon Blackburn, Steven Pinker, and Roger Bingham. If human morality is an evolutionary adaptation and if neuroscientists can identify specific brain circuitry governing moral judgment, can scientists determine what is, in fact, right and wrong?

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